The Story Behind this Blog

Being from the South, Silver is a very big part of my life. It doesn't have anything to do with wealth. Although those with more money - old money, tend to have more of it. New money tend not to spend their money on Silver. They do not have the appreciation for the warmth of the metal, the beauty of the patina, the story it tells of the generations past who have used it. A true southern girl comes of age when she chooses her silver pattern, long before she chooses her mate. If she is smart, she chooses that of her mother, grandmother, or favorite great aunt who in their benevolence will pass their silver on to her. It is the pieces in those sets, the pieces on our tables, along with the pieces we find in the corners of the displays in antique stores that prompted me to start this blog. They are beautiful, they are odd, but what are they, and what in the hell do you do with them?

Monday, July 27, 2015

Park Avenue by Manchester

Manchester introduced their Park Avenue pattern in 1931. The design itself is fairly simple, however the serving pieces are fairly ornate. Take the Cold Meat Serving Fork - I have never seen such an ornate piece. It looks to me more like a Tomato or Cucumber server in other patterns. Also note the unique style of the butter spreader - more modern than most 1931 patterns.

Cold Meat Serving Fork (8 1/2 inches)



Cream Soup Spoon (6 1/8 inches)



Flat Handle Butter Spreader (6 1/4 inches)


Pie Server (9 5/8 inches)







Friday, July 24, 2015

Queens by CJ Vander

There are several Queens patterns including Queens by Wallace, Queens by Gorham (1870), and Queens by Birks. This is Queens by CJ Vander. This is a beautiful pattern with a scallop shell design on the tip of the terminal.

Fork (8 3/8 inches)


Sugar Shell (5 1/2 inches)



Knife (10  1/4 inches)

Gadroon by Birks

Birks introduced their Gadroon pattern in 1914. It is a pattern with a strong design yet curvy lines.


Bouillion Sppon (5 inches)

















Butter Spreader (6 5/8 inches)




Small Cold Meat Serving Fork (7 1/4 inches)




Wednesday, July 22, 2015

Louis XV by Birks

I posted on various Louis XV patterns earlier but this is another Louis XV pattern I stumbled across by Birks dated back to 1914. 


Luncheon Fork (6 7/8 inches)




Bouillon Soup Spoon (4 7/8 inches)



Wired Cheese Cutter (8 5/8 inches)



Toast Server (8 3/8 inches)

Monday, July 20, 2015

Les Cinq Fleurs by Reed and Barton

Joseph Smith designed Les Cinq Fleurs for Reed and Barton in 1900. It is a lovely pattern with floral motifs.

Olive Fork (5 7/8 inches)



Knife (9 1/8 inches)





Pie Server (10 3/8 inches)



Friday, July 17, 2015

Long Handled Sherbert Spoon

Here are some examples of Long Handled Sherbert Spoons. Looking back on my earlier post on Sherbert Spoons, I see that these are not any longer than those, however the bowls are smaller and not as fat, giving the stems a longer profile. Just my guess as to why these (of the same length) are referred to "long".



Les Cinq Fleurs by Reed and Barton



Prelude by International (5 7/8 inches)



Spring Glory by International (5 7/8 inches)



Wednesday, July 15, 2015

King William by Tiffany (aka as Antique)

King William was first introduced by Tiffany as a pattern named Antique in 1870. Later the name was changed to King William. It is as simple a design as a pattern can get.

Fork (8 1/2 inches)




Gravy Ladle (7 1/8 inches)




Fish Knife (8 1/2 inches)



Iced Teaspoon (7 1/2 inches)



Monday, July 13, 2015

Hampton by Towle

Unlike the previous patterns by the same name, Towle's Hampton is more ornate. It was introduced in 1892. The stem and terminal are decorated with a design of scroll work.

Fork (7 1/2 inches)




Friday, July 10, 2015

Hampton by Wallace

A third Hampton pattern, this one was designed by Henry L. Wallace and introduced by Wallace in 1904. Henry Wallace also designed Wallace's Rose (1898) pattern. 

Salad Fork (6 inches)


Lasagna Server (9 1/2 inches)



Berry Spoon (9 1/8 inches)


Master Butter Knife (7 1/2 inches)



Hampton by Alvin

Another Hampton pattern, this one by Alvin was introduced in 1910. Once again this is a simple pattern with only a single edge encircling the stem and terminal. And the terminal being a simple four sided design.


Bouillon Soup Spoon (5 inches)



Olive Spoon (6 inches)



Two Tine Olive Fork (5 5/8 inches)



Tomato Server (7 1/2 inches)