The Story Behind this Blog

Being from the South, Silver is a very big part of my life. It doesn't have anything to do with wealth. Although those with more money - old money, tend to have more of it. New money tend not to spend their money on Silver. They do not have the appreciation for the warmth of the metal, the beauty of the patina, the story it tells of the generations past who have used it. A true southern girl comes of age when she chooses her silver pattern, long before she chooses her mate. If she is smart, she chooses that of her mother, grandmother, or favorite great aunt who in their benevolence will pass their silver on to her. It is the pieces in those sets, the pieces on our tables, along with the pieces we find in the corners of the displays in antique stores that prompted me to start this blog. They are beautiful, they are odd, but what are they, and what in the hell do you do with them?

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Les Circes by Unger

Just look at the beauty of this Art Nouveau design by Unger. Les Circes, introduced by Unger in 1904 has the lovely image of a lady's face on the terminal with the tresses of her hair trailing down the stem. Once again Unger comes through with a sterling flatware pattern that is more a art than eating utensils, if you can find a piece.




Monday, November 24, 2014

Evangeline by Unger

The Unger pattern Evangeline introduced in 1904 has the design of a face and flowers. It is an example of the true art of Edwardian era sterling flatware.

Fork ( 6 7/8 inches)

Saturday, November 22, 2014

Carollton by Watson

1914
Designer : Margaret Masson

Not to be confused with Kirk Stieff pattern of same name

Cheese Server (6 3/8 Inches)


Fork (8 inches)




Tomato Server (7 7/8 inches)



Small Steak Carving Knife (10 1/2 inches)

Friday, November 21, 2014

La Fantaisie by Unger

This is a unique pattern by Unger. La Fantaisie introduced in 1904 has a trio of blossoms on the tip of the terminal and the face of a woman at the bottom of the terminal, which is open and suitable for engraving. The stem is an elegant twist.

Fork (7 1/4 inches)



Large Casserole Spoon


Bon Bon Scoop (6 1/8 inches)



Pierced Olive Spoon (6 3/8 inches)

Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Poultry Shears Part 2

Poultry Shears were designed to cut up whole chickens after they were cooked. You will note, as opposed to the design of the Grape Shears, the Poultry Shears are much longer to better serve their mission. Also they are much less expensive, usually under $200 a pair. Here are some more examples of Poultry Shears.

Violet by Wallace (10 1/2 inches)


Athene by Amston (10 5/8 inches)




Sovereign-Old by Gorham (10 1/4 inches)


Georgian by Towle (10 1/2 inches)



Monday, November 17, 2014

Cupid's Nosegay by Unger

Unger introduced their patter Cupid's Nosegay in 1904. The pattern is ornate in the style of Unger.

Youth Tea Knife (7 1/4 inches)
 

Youth Tea Fork (6 1/8 inches)




Friday, November 14, 2014

Ecstacy by Amston

Isadore A. Lipman designed the pattern Ecstacy for Amston in 1951. It has a simple floral motif garnishing the tip of the terminal cascading just slightly down the side of the terminal a bit. The stem is clean of any lines or ornamentation with the exception of a brief touch of floral on the very tip just at the shoulder.

Master Butter Knife (6 7/8 inches)


Salad Fork (6 3/8 inches)


Iced Tea Spoon (7 1/2 inches)





Wednesday, November 12, 2014

Grape Shears (Part 2)

Several years ago I posted on sterling "shears", both Grape and Poultry. Here I am going to focus on Grape Shears. These were designed as utensils to use when serving grapes to cut the fruit from the pulpy stems. The handles are usually ornate. These pieces are not easy to come by and can run anywhere from $500 to as much as $2000 a piece retail.

 Chrysanthemum by Tiffany (6 5/8 inches)





Ancestry by Weidlich (7 inches)


Repousse by Kirk-Stieff (6 3/4 inches)



Monday, November 10, 2014

Floral Series #10 by Watson

Watson's Floral Series #10 has an open terminal similar to their Series # 4, but the  stem of each piece in this pattern is a simple double line design. I could also find a Lily of the Valley motif in this pattern.

Wild Rose (Fruit Orange Spoon 5 7/8 inches)


Carnation (Five O'Clock Spoon 5 3/4 inches)



Friday, November 7, 2014

Lobster Forks Part 3

Several years ago I posted on Lobster Forks. I recently found two more examples of these pieces. They are not found in many patterns. I have seen examples of them in patterns by Durgin, Alvin, Tiffany, and Reed and Barton.

Old Newbury by Towle (6 1/4 inches)


Fleur De Lis by Alvin (6 1/4 inches)